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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
newtown on a community in mourning. >> woodruff: and as parents around the country nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season that should have been alive with the joy of children is now, instead, a season of mourning their loss in newtown, connecticut. the first of the funerals took place today for the victims of the massacre at an elementary school. r
and friends in newtown are searching for a way to turn the horror of friday's killings into something positive for their community. hari sreenivasan has our conversation. >> ifill: kira kay reports on an election to watch in india, where the leading candidate for chief minister of one state, narendra modi, is both loved and loathed. >> for all of modi's popularity, he is also one of the most polarizing figures in india today, despised by many for a period of vicious communal violence that happened on his watch. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown remembers the life of war hero and medal of honor winner daniel inouye, the senator from hawaii who was third in line to the presidency. >> ifill: and we close with the story of a message of hope and healing from the late fred rogers, in a 34-year-old photo that's gone viral. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance t
are betting. the canal's neighbor to the north, newtown creek, can offer up its own beautiful vistas, but both waterways are also surrounded by heavy industry as they've been for more than a hundred years. so they're among the most polluted in the country. so bad that the environmental protection agency has designated both as super fund clean-up sites. >> there are persistent con tam napts there like p.c.b.s, like heavy metals, that have been there probably for a good part of the last century. >> reporter: thomas burke teaches about the environment and public health at johns hopkins university. >> there are also combustion by-product -- that sounds like a fancy term -- but that's from the old plants there, coal tar plants and plants like that so there's heavy petroleum molecules too. >> reporter: some of those chemicals in the water have been shown to cause cancer in animals. others can damage the central nervous system. both the creek and the canal overtop their banks when sandy's storm surge reached them. the water lapped on to sidewalks and poured into buildings nearby. here in the green po
in this country, memories of violence and loss were still fresh in newtown, connecticut. as townspeople filled trinity episcopal church on christmas eve. the pastor focused on the youngest worshippers ten days after a gunman killed 20 students and six adults at an elementary school. >> i just want to ask how you are. are you good? >> yeah. are you okay? are you doing okay? >> ifill: today visitors stopped by a snow-covered memorial to those lost at sandy hook. >> as a parent, i just wanted o come to respect the kids and the adulls. it touched everybody's heart. i just couldn't move forward without coming this morning early, you know, and just saying a prayer. >> we just wanted to come down and show support for the families obviously they will never be the same again. whose holidays will never be. >> ifill: in parts of the country's mid section, the holiday was marked by bad weather. snow was moving from the ozarks through the ohio valley, causing blizzard warnings in indiana and kentucky. sleet, freezing rain caused a 21-car pile-up in oklahoma. and left cars spinning on icy roads all the way
thoughts and prayers are with the families affected by the school shooting in newtown, connecticut. now, to help those of you who would like to talk about the incident with your children, we provided a link to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these stude
, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try. >> rose: joining me now is michael bloomberg. he's the mayor of new york city and he's also the co-chair of mayors against illegal guns. he's long been an outspoken advocate of gun control. he is now call on the nation's lawmakers to make reducing gun violence their top priority. here's what he said earlier today at a city hall press conference. >> if the massacre in tucson wasn't enough to make our national leaders act, and if the more recent bloodshed in aurora, colorado, and oak creaks wisconsin, and portland oregon and other cities and towns wasn't enough, perhaps the slaughter of innocence at sandy hook elementary school will at long last be enough. millions of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without ac
in newtown, well, it just took it to another whole level. you've seen reflected already in some early polling data. this is something that really seems to be where the ice is breaking. that there is a much more open, a greater willingness on the part of folks including some conservatives in the media and on cap follow-- capitol hill to ent-- to entertain what we call common sense gun restrictions. and it's the pictures. we have all attended vicariously funeral after funeral after funeral. that has to have an impact. >> woodruff: and imagining what those parents and family members are going through through. >> absolutely. >> woodruff: finally what about internationally, we spent a lot of time this year talking about syria, the middle east, some about china. what do you see on the global landscape? >> china i think is very important thing to mentionment because in the last two years china has become the second largest economy in the world, not the third. and one thing interesting, we sent three astronauts into outer space, docked with another module that is what a country does when it really wa
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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